A First taste...
An accumulation of my thoughts, things that inspire, move, motivate and make me question. Hopefully it can do the same for you...
A First taste...
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pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.
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thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

Ching Shih
Nancy Wake
Lyudmila Pavlichenko
Rukhsana Kausar
The Gulabi Gang
Neerja Bhanot
Zainab Bibi
Susan Walters
Nong Thoom
Juliane Koepcke
I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Reblogging for the names of these fabulous women right here <3
+
allakinwande:

The following article appeared in the January, 2005 issue of African Americans On Wheels magazine.  ____________________________________ Written by Monette Bailey CR Patterson & Son America’s Only African-American Automobile Manufacturers
Some of the finest buggies made in the late 1800s came out of a small, black-owned company in Ohio. Charles Rich Patterson’s Company later made motor vehicles, and history, by founding the country’s only African-American-owned automobile manufacturing company.
To hear Tom Smith tell it, had Patterson been a white man, Greenfield, Ohio could have been another Detroit. Smith - car dealer and life-long resident of Greenfield - has spent years compiling mementos and information about the historical family.
Just before the Civil War, Patterson left slavery and headed north, bringing blacksmithing skills he learned in Virginia. Not long after settling in, Patterson began working at a carriage company. By 1870 he was a foreman and by 1873, Patterson had gone into business with J.P. Lowe, a white carriage maker.
“When Lowe died about a decade later, Patterson become the sole owner. He made 28 different horse-drawn vehicles; doctor buggies, backboards, phaetons, rockaways and surreys,” says Smith, who managed to find and buy three Patterson buggies.
By 1883, Patterson’s two sons, Frederick Douglas and Samuel, could help dad work at what had become C.R. Patterson and Son Carriage Company. “They became natural mechanics and even built some of their own designs,” says Smith. Sam died in 1889. Fred went on to make his own history by being the first black person to graduate from the town’s high school in 1888 and the first black football player at Ohio State in 1891.
Fred left Greenfield to teach history in Louisville, Ky. after graduating from Ohio State. He rejoined his father in 1897 and began taking a greater leadership role in the company. “In 1902, there was one car to every 65,000 people. In 1909, there was one to every 800,” says Smith. “Fred could see the buggy was a dying industry.”
After C.R. died in 1910, Fred began tinkering with motor-driven vehicles with a goal to build a car that could rival anything produced by the new automotive industry. The company still made buggies, but also turned its attention to creating the Greenfield touring car and a roadster.
“There are different reports, but [it seems] on Sept. 23, 1915, the first car rolled off the line,” says Smith. According to advertisements, the two-door vehicle featured a full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting and a split windshield for ventilation. “They didn’t make the engine. It was a Continental, capable of up to 50 miles per hour.” The car cost $850. “I’ve read in several places that it was superior to Henry Ford’s Model T.”
A lack of capital stopped production of the cars in 1919, but Fred moved on to producing trucks and buses. “It was the backbone of the business in the ‘20s and ‘30s. They used wood frames with metal skins, on mostly Dodge chassis,” says Smith. Estimates say that between 30 and 150 vehicles were built, “but my guess is toward the lower number, looking at what they had to work with and the people here at the time.”
As far as Smith can tell, there aren’t any left. He’s managed to find the top of a school bus and he videotaped an interview with C.R. Patterson’s grand daughter-in-law before she died last year at 93. In it she talks about the company driving two buses to New York to be shipped to Haiti. However, as with nearly everyone, the Depression in the ‘30s dealt a fatal blow to Patterson’s company.
Smith thinks it’s a shame that more people aren’t aware of C.R. Patterson’s place in history. He invites visitors to Greenfield to see a small display he set up at the historical society on the east end of town.
allakinwande:

The following article appeared in the January, 2005 issue of African Americans On Wheels magazine.  ____________________________________ Written by Monette Bailey CR Patterson & Son America’s Only African-American Automobile Manufacturers
Some of the finest buggies made in the late 1800s came out of a small, black-owned company in Ohio. Charles Rich Patterson’s Company later made motor vehicles, and history, by founding the country’s only African-American-owned automobile manufacturing company.
To hear Tom Smith tell it, had Patterson been a white man, Greenfield, Ohio could have been another Detroit. Smith - car dealer and life-long resident of Greenfield - has spent years compiling mementos and information about the historical family.
Just before the Civil War, Patterson left slavery and headed north, bringing blacksmithing skills he learned in Virginia. Not long after settling in, Patterson began working at a carriage company. By 1870 he was a foreman and by 1873, Patterson had gone into business with J.P. Lowe, a white carriage maker.
“When Lowe died about a decade later, Patterson become the sole owner. He made 28 different horse-drawn vehicles; doctor buggies, backboards, phaetons, rockaways and surreys,” says Smith, who managed to find and buy three Patterson buggies.
By 1883, Patterson’s two sons, Frederick Douglas and Samuel, could help dad work at what had become C.R. Patterson and Son Carriage Company. “They became natural mechanics and even built some of their own designs,” says Smith. Sam died in 1889. Fred went on to make his own history by being the first black person to graduate from the town’s high school in 1888 and the first black football player at Ohio State in 1891.
Fred left Greenfield to teach history in Louisville, Ky. after graduating from Ohio State. He rejoined his father in 1897 and began taking a greater leadership role in the company. “In 1902, there was one car to every 65,000 people. In 1909, there was one to every 800,” says Smith. “Fred could see the buggy was a dying industry.”
After C.R. died in 1910, Fred began tinkering with motor-driven vehicles with a goal to build a car that could rival anything produced by the new automotive industry. The company still made buggies, but also turned its attention to creating the Greenfield touring car and a roadster.
“There are different reports, but [it seems] on Sept. 23, 1915, the first car rolled off the line,” says Smith. According to advertisements, the two-door vehicle featured a full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting and a split windshield for ventilation. “They didn’t make the engine. It was a Continental, capable of up to 50 miles per hour.” The car cost $850. “I’ve read in several places that it was superior to Henry Ford’s Model T.”
A lack of capital stopped production of the cars in 1919, but Fred moved on to producing trucks and buses. “It was the backbone of the business in the ‘20s and ‘30s. They used wood frames with metal skins, on mostly Dodge chassis,” says Smith. Estimates say that between 30 and 150 vehicles were built, “but my guess is toward the lower number, looking at what they had to work with and the people here at the time.”
As far as Smith can tell, there aren’t any left. He’s managed to find the top of a school bus and he videotaped an interview with C.R. Patterson’s grand daughter-in-law before she died last year at 93. In it she talks about the company driving two buses to New York to be shipped to Haiti. However, as with nearly everyone, the Depression in the ‘30s dealt a fatal blow to Patterson’s company.
Smith thinks it’s a shame that more people aren’t aware of C.R. Patterson’s place in history. He invites visitors to Greenfield to see a small display he set up at the historical society on the east end of town.
allakinwande:

The following article appeared in the January, 2005 issue of African Americans On Wheels magazine.  ____________________________________ Written by Monette Bailey CR Patterson & Son America’s Only African-American Automobile Manufacturers
Some of the finest buggies made in the late 1800s came out of a small, black-owned company in Ohio. Charles Rich Patterson’s Company later made motor vehicles, and history, by founding the country’s only African-American-owned automobile manufacturing company.
To hear Tom Smith tell it, had Patterson been a white man, Greenfield, Ohio could have been another Detroit. Smith - car dealer and life-long resident of Greenfield - has spent years compiling mementos and information about the historical family.
Just before the Civil War, Patterson left slavery and headed north, bringing blacksmithing skills he learned in Virginia. Not long after settling in, Patterson began working at a carriage company. By 1870 he was a foreman and by 1873, Patterson had gone into business with J.P. Lowe, a white carriage maker.
“When Lowe died about a decade later, Patterson become the sole owner. He made 28 different horse-drawn vehicles; doctor buggies, backboards, phaetons, rockaways and surreys,” says Smith, who managed to find and buy three Patterson buggies.
By 1883, Patterson’s two sons, Frederick Douglas and Samuel, could help dad work at what had become C.R. Patterson and Son Carriage Company. “They became natural mechanics and even built some of their own designs,” says Smith. Sam died in 1889. Fred went on to make his own history by being the first black person to graduate from the town’s high school in 1888 and the first black football player at Ohio State in 1891.
Fred left Greenfield to teach history in Louisville, Ky. after graduating from Ohio State. He rejoined his father in 1897 and began taking a greater leadership role in the company. “In 1902, there was one car to every 65,000 people. In 1909, there was one to every 800,” says Smith. “Fred could see the buggy was a dying industry.”
After C.R. died in 1910, Fred began tinkering with motor-driven vehicles with a goal to build a car that could rival anything produced by the new automotive industry. The company still made buggies, but also turned its attention to creating the Greenfield touring car and a roadster.
“There are different reports, but [it seems] on Sept. 23, 1915, the first car rolled off the line,” says Smith. According to advertisements, the two-door vehicle featured a full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting and a split windshield for ventilation. “They didn’t make the engine. It was a Continental, capable of up to 50 miles per hour.” The car cost $850. “I’ve read in several places that it was superior to Henry Ford’s Model T.”
A lack of capital stopped production of the cars in 1919, but Fred moved on to producing trucks and buses. “It was the backbone of the business in the ‘20s and ‘30s. They used wood frames with metal skins, on mostly Dodge chassis,” says Smith. Estimates say that between 30 and 150 vehicles were built, “but my guess is toward the lower number, looking at what they had to work with and the people here at the time.”
As far as Smith can tell, there aren’t any left. He’s managed to find the top of a school bus and he videotaped an interview with C.R. Patterson’s grand daughter-in-law before she died last year at 93. In it she talks about the company driving two buses to New York to be shipped to Haiti. However, as with nearly everyone, the Depression in the ‘30s dealt a fatal blow to Patterson’s company.
Smith thinks it’s a shame that more people aren’t aware of C.R. Patterson’s place in history. He invites visitors to Greenfield to see a small display he set up at the historical society on the east end of town.
allakinwande:

The following article appeared in the January, 2005 issue of African Americans On Wheels magazine.  ____________________________________ Written by Monette Bailey CR Patterson & Son America’s Only African-American Automobile Manufacturers
Some of the finest buggies made in the late 1800s came out of a small, black-owned company in Ohio. Charles Rich Patterson’s Company later made motor vehicles, and history, by founding the country’s only African-American-owned automobile manufacturing company.
To hear Tom Smith tell it, had Patterson been a white man, Greenfield, Ohio could have been another Detroit. Smith - car dealer and life-long resident of Greenfield - has spent years compiling mementos and information about the historical family.
Just before the Civil War, Patterson left slavery and headed north, bringing blacksmithing skills he learned in Virginia. Not long after settling in, Patterson began working at a carriage company. By 1870 he was a foreman and by 1873, Patterson had gone into business with J.P. Lowe, a white carriage maker.
“When Lowe died about a decade later, Patterson become the sole owner. He made 28 different horse-drawn vehicles; doctor buggies, backboards, phaetons, rockaways and surreys,” says Smith, who managed to find and buy three Patterson buggies.
By 1883, Patterson’s two sons, Frederick Douglas and Samuel, could help dad work at what had become C.R. Patterson and Son Carriage Company. “They became natural mechanics and even built some of their own designs,” says Smith. Sam died in 1889. Fred went on to make his own history by being the first black person to graduate from the town’s high school in 1888 and the first black football player at Ohio State in 1891.
Fred left Greenfield to teach history in Louisville, Ky. after graduating from Ohio State. He rejoined his father in 1897 and began taking a greater leadership role in the company. “In 1902, there was one car to every 65,000 people. In 1909, there was one to every 800,” says Smith. “Fred could see the buggy was a dying industry.”
After C.R. died in 1910, Fred began tinkering with motor-driven vehicles with a goal to build a car that could rival anything produced by the new automotive industry. The company still made buggies, but also turned its attention to creating the Greenfield touring car and a roadster.
“There are different reports, but [it seems] on Sept. 23, 1915, the first car rolled off the line,” says Smith. According to advertisements, the two-door vehicle featured a full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting and a split windshield for ventilation. “They didn’t make the engine. It was a Continental, capable of up to 50 miles per hour.” The car cost $850. “I’ve read in several places that it was superior to Henry Ford’s Model T.”
A lack of capital stopped production of the cars in 1919, but Fred moved on to producing trucks and buses. “It was the backbone of the business in the ‘20s and ‘30s. They used wood frames with metal skins, on mostly Dodge chassis,” says Smith. Estimates say that between 30 and 150 vehicles were built, “but my guess is toward the lower number, looking at what they had to work with and the people here at the time.”
As far as Smith can tell, there aren’t any left. He’s managed to find the top of a school bus and he videotaped an interview with C.R. Patterson’s grand daughter-in-law before she died last year at 93. In it she talks about the company driving two buses to New York to be shipped to Haiti. However, as with nearly everyone, the Depression in the ‘30s dealt a fatal blow to Patterson’s company.
Smith thinks it’s a shame that more people aren’t aware of C.R. Patterson’s place in history. He invites visitors to Greenfield to see a small display he set up at the historical society on the east end of town.
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"If you don’t end up smiling while you are kissing someone, you are probably kissing the wrong person."
Things I wish I’d learned a long time ago (via insanity-and-vanity)
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thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
thepoliticalfreakshow:

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.
Links:
Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart
Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story
You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Reblogging this again, because it’s the exact same reason why my blog is covering all of the different murders of African-Americans, whether by police or other perpetrators. 
John Crawford’s story will be fully shared later this weekend.
+
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"Life goes quickly. It’s such a shame to waste time. We always think we have so much of it."
― Mitch Albom (via psych-quotes)
UN Peacekeepers Buy Young Haitian Girls for Sex
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quickweaves:

harinef:

wmagazine:

Naomi Campbell is our October Cover Girl
Photograph by Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine October 2014. 

blessed art thou eternal our god king of the universe

Unstoppable
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thegiantlife:

STRENGTH
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oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
oeusrnm:

Black Panthers | Agnès Varda | 1968
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sully-s:

Egyptian Mermaid